Double Down - A Blog

May 1, 2015 | Posted by Scott Dickensheets
(The following is based on a Q&A — which I have liberally tinkered with, including adding some of my own questions — with Kristen Peterson of the Las Vegas Weekly)

Why did you choose the subject of impermanence? 

Last year, in my capacity as deputy editor of Desert Companion magazine, I profiled an art photographer named Marshall Schuettle. A lot of his work grapples with transience and permanence — marginalized people in tenuous situations, a social infrastructure that feels like it could collapse at any moment, fleeting intersections of desire and cityscape, but sometimes juxtaposed against majestic landscapes evoking unchanging time. And that got me thinking: How much art have I seen that addressed transience in a...

Apr 15, 2015 | Posted by Christina Barr

I first became aware of StoryCorps - a nonprofit organization dedicated to recording and archiving the stories and conversations of everyday people - shortly after it launched in 2003 and placed its first listening booth in Grand Central Station in New York City. As a folklorist, I was amazed and impressed at the populism of that recording booth, and even recored my own interview there. Now, twelve years later, StoryCorps has recorded more than 50,000 interviews from more than 100,000 participants around the globe. The StoryCorps archive is housed at the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress. Nevada Humanities partnered with KUNR Reno Public...

Mar 18, 2015 | Posted by Alicia Barber, Ph.D

[Harolds Club patriarch Raymond I. “Pappy” Smith purchased Cremer’s Motel in the early 1950s, thoroughly renovated the property, and reopened it as Harolds Pony Express Lodge.  Photo courtesy of Special Collections, University of Nevada, Reno Libraries.]

When I began to interview small business owners, neighborhood residents, and city representatives about Reno’s 4th Street back in 2011, I had no idea that  more than three  years later, I would be announcing the launch of a multimedia digital feature dedicated to the history of 4th Street and its companion street in Sparks, Prater Way.

And yet here we are! The new site, housed on the ONE at...

Feb 13, 2015 | Posted by Karen Wikander

Exciting news for the 2015 Nevada Reads! The surveys have been compiled, the votes tallied, and a book selection has been made.

Nevada Reads is the state's first "one read" program, with people from throughout Nevada reading a selected text and then coming together to discuss the work at lectures, book clubs, and various panel events.

The 2015 Nevada Reads novel is We Are Called to Rise, by Laura McBride, a writer and community college teacher in Las Vegas, Nevada.

"Three lives are bound together by a split-second mistake, and a child’s fate hangs in the balance. What happens next will test—and restore—your faith in humanity.

Far from the neon lights of the Vegas strip, three lives are about to collide. A middle...

Dec 17, 2014 | Posted by Rachel Hopkin
Lyndsey Langsdale (left) and Toni Ortega (right) at Lost City Farm. Photo courtesy of Rachel Hopkin/Nevada Humanities.
 
While the weather outside is frightful (fingers crossed), it's a good time to reflect upon urban farming!
 
Nevada's Hidden Stories is an occasional series that sheds light on the unique people, places, and communities which make Nevada the place we call home.  It’s produced by Rachel Hopkin and Nevada Humanities.  This report is about Lost City Farm which is Reno's first modern urban farm. It's situated on the corner of Center Street and Moran in the midtown area of the city and its the creation of two young entrepreneurs - Toni Ortega and...
Nov 9, 2014 | Posted by Rachel Hopkin

As regular readers of this blog will already know, Nevada's Hidden Stories is a partnership we have in place with Reno Public Radio - an occasional series, produced by Rachel Hopkin, that sheds light on the unique people, places, and communities which make this state the place we call home. 

The most recent report was put together in honor of Veterans' Day and is about an unusual art project based in Reno called Combat Paper Nevada.  Combat Paper Nevada is part of a range of artistic activities organised by the David...

Nov 7, 2014 | Posted by Christina Barr

Make a Gift to Nevada Humanities

When we speak to people who support the work of Nevada Humanities they almost always talk about how our programs make them feel more deeply engaged in their communities, or how our programs have driven home ideas and perspectives about what it means to be a Nevadan.

Writer and educator Christopher Coake believes that "the humanities aren't an abstract concept. By interacting with art, literature, music, and history, people can become better thinkers, better neighbors, better citizens. By bringing the best of the humanities to our state, by making our good life here even better, the folks at Nevada Humanities...
Oct 27, 2014 | Posted by Daniel Enrique Pérez

In 2004, my first year as an assistant professor at the University of Nevada, Reno, I had the privilege of meeting Dolores Huerta. She was invited to UNR to speak and was awarded an honorary doctorate—one of nine she holds. Huerta has been recognized for her life-long work as a grassroots organizer and the instrumental role she played during the civil rights movement. She remains at the forefront of so many important causes: workers’ rights, civil and human rights, the advancement of women, and the environment. Twice she received U.S. presidential awards: the Medal of Freedom (2012) and the Eleanor D. Roosevelt Human Rights Awards (1998).

Like many who have the privilege of meeting great leaders, when I first met Dolores Huerta, I was humbled by her presence. Very few...

Sep 18, 2014 | Posted by John Rice

A favorite thing for me regarding the time I spend in Tuscarora is what seems to be an endless opportunity for something new to do to keep me from doing what I ought to do.  Earlier this summer, a neighbor’s cattle were a fixture in our community. For a few of those days, a large Angus bull took a shine to the shade and the cool grass in our yard. We forged a special relationship.

Now first, yes, I know, as anyone who lives in rural Nevada must know (and accept) that Nevada is a “fence out” state. If you don’t want cows in your yard, then build a good fence. Building fences isn’t a strong suit for me, and the Angus bull made himself at home.

I called my ranching friend and let them know of my problem, and they reminded me that it truly was my problem, not theirs...

Aug 18, 2014 | Posted by Daniel Enrique Pérez

In their heyday, Tuscarora and Jarbidge had populations of approximately 4000 and 1500, respectively. Today, they each have less than 100 year-round residents. Whereas they at one time had enough residents to sustain schools and other vital services, they are now at risk of becoming ghost towns. And if it were not for the commitment and love that locals indefatigably demonstrate for these unincorporated communities in Elko County, Nevada, they would surely become specters of an era long past. Instead, they remain full of life and unique opportunities for engaging with others and nature.

I had the privilege of visiting these two areas for the first time in early August of this year. Tuscarora is approximately 50 miles northwest of Elko while Jarbidge sits 100 miles northeast;...

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