Uncovering the Traces

By Joan Robinson

As long as I can remember, I have been fascinated with ruins. Maybe it started with that picture of my father as a college boy standing shirtless in the Coliseum, thumb pointing downward with the ruthless arrogance of a petulant Caesar. Or maybe it started with our family’s monthly visits to Detroit, already crumbling to ruin in the 1970s. Whatever started it, the Mojave Desert has offered me a wealth of atmospheric, tumble-down facades to explore from Rhyolite to Goldfield, to Nelson’s Techatticup Mine, and then just over the border to the Liberty Bell Arc. There are ghost towns and abandoned mines aplenty to explore.

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Aliza Pantoja
The Ten-Year Inquiry

By Scott Dickensheets and Geoff Schumacher
On October 17, 2019, Nevada Humanities and Huntington Press will release A Change Is Gonna Come: Reinvention in the City of Second Chances with a reception beginning at 6 pm and author readings at 7pm at the Clark County Library in Las Vegas. This anthology of essays, stories, and poems by Las Vegas writers is the tenth volume of Las Vegas Writes, an annual project of the Las Vegas Book Festival that highlights the community’s deep and sustaining literary talent pool and also program of Nevada Humanities.

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Aliza Pantoja
Dear Norton Juster

By Robert Chondro

Dear Norton Juster,
Before reading your book, The Phantom Tollbooth, I never really gave a care about life. To me, it was a blur; wake up, go to school, come home, and repeat. At home, I would rush through all my homework, finish it just so I could get it done. I always took the closest way to do anything, instead of choosing the way where I could actually learn something.

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Cheyanne TreadwayThomas
Daytime Programming with Nito

By Everett George

I used to think caring about stories was dangerous and could very much ruin your life. I was enrolled in online schooling for most of my teen years, which was real isolating and a solid way to lose friends. I’d read, I had liked stories a lot, they seemed to help, and stories encouraged me to get started on making my own. Which was going alright until around the time I turned 14 and my uncle died.

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Cheyanne TreadwayThomas
Border Being

By Lydia Huerta

The current political moment has made the physical border between the US and Mexico a protagonist with a life all of its own. In some cases, the news of the militarization, the violence, the migrant detention camps, the family separations, and the most recent targeted shooting of Mexicans in El Paso seem to make the border into a scene from a forthcoming apocalypse.

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Maren Rush
Weeds

By Shaun T. Griffin

This morning, under warm sun, I weeded the roots of lavender, Chinese poppies, and the locust, an activity so benign it hardly merits mention, except of course, if it is aborted by the unwanted hands of justice. Almost every other week I go to the medium security prison to teach a poetry workshop.

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Cheyanne TreadwayThomas
Reno – A Science Fictional Place to Be

By David Durham

When I decided to return to an academic career (after several years of being a full-time writer), I knew a job search could result in an offer anywhere in the country. A worrying thought. When I saw the University of Nevada, Reno’s (UNR) advertisement for a fiction faculty member to join the relatively new MFA program I knew I’d found my hoped-for, go-to destination. 

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Cheyanne TreadwayThomas
Poetry: A Space of Possibility

By Joanne Mallari

During National Poetry Month, I met Stephanie Gibson, who is a program manager at Nevada Humanities. When Stephanie invited me to curate a panel for the 2019 Nevada Humanities Literary Crawl, she asked me this question: How do you see poetry functioning out in the world?

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Cheyanne TreadwayThomas
Mojave in July

By Angela M. Brommel

You can’t explain to friends from home how the desert makes it better, but you try:

Imagine a heat so dry that it presses down into the earth, releasing its scent so that it takes on the comforting smell of clay pots in your grandmother’s kitchen when you were a child,

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Rogue Wheat Paste Installations

By Deon Reynolds

A few years back, my wife Trish and I were commissioned to create several large-scale wheat paste murals for the Western Folklife Center’s National Cowboy Poetry Gathering in Elko, Nevada … we cooked up our own flour and water mixture to make the glue, which is applied to the wall, as well as over the art work itself. The images were printed on 24-inch-wide rolls of light-weight plotter paper.

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Storytime

By Christopher Daniels

Author Barry Lopez states “the only thing holding us together are stories and compassion.” I love stories of all genres and media. I live for terrible made-for-TV movies, binge on gripping Netflix dramas, have a stacks of books on my nightstands (that I vow I am going to read before purchasing more new books), gleefully research the mythologies of various world wisdom traditions, and watch, with wide-eyed wonder, the magic of live theatre.

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